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PostPosted: Wed Oct 17, 2018 1:04 pm 
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I'm watching this because it would solve many problems for me, if it actually works and the spam filtering is any good. It's a $500 device + $100/year after the first year that places a small encrypted server in your home that communicates over your residential Internet connection through a VPN, allowing you to (easily) run your own email and calendaring service, where you physically possess and encrypt the data stored there. The front end is a server somewhere else on the Internet running the email and calendar gateways, forwarding data to the server in your house.

https://arstechnica.com/information-tec ... your-home/

Yes, you could set this up all by yourself for a lot fewer $$$ if you were clever and patient, but I suspect that most people with a desire to do so are lacking either the skills or the time. I certainly fall in this category, specifically the time part (not by a long shot), but to be frank about it, I also don't think I could set up really good spam filtering nor useful calendaring by myself on top of something I might cobble together.

- Anonymous


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 17, 2018 5:40 pm 
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The Ars author says he dislikes Gmail because it's scanned by Google. My e-mail (not free) now provided by AOL (even more hideous than Verizon, but have found workarounds to avoid the worst of it) formerly directly by Verizon, is supposedly being scanned, or will be once I accept the new terms-- have so far just ignored. Not sure if ignorng new terms makes any difference.

In researching this issue, I came across any number of articles which said that Google no longer scans. On the basis of that, created a Gmail account to be used only for "sensitive" messaging. So which is it, has Google stopped scanning or not?

Interesting article, but like the author not ready to plunk down $500.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 17, 2018 8:40 pm 
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Google indeed claims it stopped scanning email last year-ish, but it still allows app developers to scan it. I also don't particularly trust Google to usually do the right thing for data they host. If I can't hold it in my hand, it's not really mine.

I'm actually mostly interested in it because you get a lot of flexibility by running your own mail server. I'd love to run my own mail server again, except for the part about running a mail server, and all the network shenanigans you have to deal with to make the damned thing work. I have several domains and many email addresses used for different purposes, and don't always like the way third parties manage those things for me. Plus, there's a lot of value in holding all that in my hand.

Oh, and calendars. Why hasn't anyone but Google ever figured out how to may online calendars work properly?? If they'd have that, this would be very well suited to small businesses unwilling to give those data to Google.

But no, $500 is still a bit too steep for me personally. If it were $300 + $60 / year I might be close to the front of the line.

- Anonymous


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2018 12:06 pm 
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Anon, as our resident GDPR expert, what's your take on this extract from the new AOL terms re., scanning private messages? Wouldn't this be a head on violation of privacy? Is GDPR why Google stopped scanning mail?

Quote:
We’ve updated how we collect and use data. We’ve updated some of the ways we collect and analyze user data in order to deliver services, content, and relevant advertising to you and protect against abuse. This includes:
Analyzing content and information (including emails, instant messages, posts, photos, attachments, and other communications) when you use our services. This allows us to deliver, personalize and develop relevant features, content, advertising and services
Linking your activity on third-party sites and apps with information we have about you
Providing anonymized and aggregated reports to other parties regarding user trends


Also this curiosity -- naturally, I haven't agreed to anything

Quote:
Q. When will this change apply to me?

A: If you access Oath services as a signed-in user (e.g. you have an account and sign-in to access services like Messenger, Yahoo Mail, AOL Mail and others) you will need to agree to the new Oath Terms of Service and Oath Privacy Policy. These changes take effect for signed-in users as soon as they agree. Until you agree your account will remain under the legacy AOL Terms and Privacy Policy or legacy, Yahoo Terms and Privacy Policy. Eventually, you will need to agree to continue accessing your account.
If you access Oath services via a signed-out state (e.g., services where an account and sign-in are not required like Yahoo Search), the new Oath Terms and Service and Privacy Policy will apply to you as of 25 May 2018.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2018 1:16 pm 
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WZZZ wrote:
Anon, as our resident GDPR expert, what's your take on this extract from the new AOL terms re., scanning private messages? Wouldn't this be a head on violation of privacy? Is GDPR why Google stopped scanning mail?

Would this scanning be a GDPR violation? My own guess, yes, unless you're opting in, but this is clearly an opt-out situation which is a violation unless it's supported by one of the other "lawful basis" for collecting the information, such as the catchall "legitimate interests" basis -- which the Europeans seem to construe pretty narrowly. Since scanning your email to sell your data to advertisers isn't intrinsic to delivering your message, there's likely no justifiable "legitimate interest" from the perspective of the GDPR regulator. Keeping your email in order to allow you to download it would, in contrast, seem to satisfy a "legitimate interest."

Why did Google really claim they stopped scanning for marketing purposes? Who knows. What I recall them saying at the time was that it was "confusing" for business (paying) customers who were concerned their corporate mail would be used to target ads or build marketing profiles. The dark clouds of EU privacy rules on the horizon may have made the decision easier.

Quote:
Also this curiosity -- naturally, I haven't agreed to anything

Forcing you to accept their terms or decline service also seems like a violation.

My take is that they're hoping they make so much money, and that their lawyers will be able to tie up the process for so long, they'll get their quarterly bonuses for most of a decade before they end up paying billion dollar fines. Not a bad gig if you're a multi-billion dollar business full of lobbyists and high quality staff lawyers to fight this stuff in perpetuity. They might also be hoping that Facebook and Google will bear the brunt of the assault, and they'll slide under the radar for a while.

As always, I am not a lawyer, let alone your lawyer, and this is not legal advice.

- Anonymous


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2018 1:29 pm 
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What I find "interesting," aka, very upsetting is that when I do any kind of search regarding user push back against this privacy invading garbage, I come up empty handed. And here's a nice piece of "Orwellliana:"

Quote:
...We see GDPR as a win for consumers and brands. This new regulation offers an opportunity to differentiate our products and services in the market by enhancing data protections and the rights of our members. All of the steps we are taking, for both our members and our partners, are aimed at adhering to the highest standards of privacy, reinforcing our dedication to trust and transparency at every stage of the member experience.

https://www.oath.com/2018/03/20/gdpr-an ... publisher/


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2018 2:12 pm 
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It is of course possible, no matter how unlikely, that their new terms of service are actually compatible with the GDPR.

At this point you really don't have any leverage. I don't know how you'd "push back." Europe was right about that, even if the GDPR is a monstrosity. The invisible hand of the free market isn't going to solve this problem: it only created it.

- Anonymous


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 20, 2018 4:26 am 
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Location: Caught between the moon and NYC
Verizon: Reminding you just how much we suck as often as possible, as much as possible.


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