XYMer's Home away from Home

When http://bbs.xlr8yourmac.com is down (i.e. always)
It is currently Thu Sep 21, 2017 10:20 pm

All times are UTC - 8 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 62 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Sun Jan 05, 2014 1:33 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Apr 11, 2009 2:15 pm
Posts: 5914
Location: NYC
Well, I finally decided on this one http://www.samsung.com/us/video/tvs/UN32EH5000FXZA

Going to be entering a brand new world. My primary concern right now is how the headphones will sound, even with an inline volume control attached. Apparently there won't be any settings for this from the TV. No way to adjust volume, bass or treble. It will be just the raw output with full bass and treble.

And then I'm wondering what the built-in speakers will sound like. The ones on the 22" sound terrible, like they're inside a reverb chamber inside a tin can. Hoping the bigger model will have better sound, but might need to go to external speakers if that's the case. That will be the next bridge to cross, and maybe jailbreaking the Apple TV, since it's a 2 refurb, missing some programs I might want.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jan 05, 2014 4:33 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 15, 2008 8:13 pm
Posts: 9442
Location: Caught between the moon and NYC
Depending on the size of your room, these may be good (if you can control volume via the TV):
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00EZ9XKCM/

I bought them for TV watching and they sound great, though I initially intended to use them for horizontal operation (under the display, side by side) but decided against it (not enough L/R separation). However the office where I spend most of my time is the size of a small bedroom.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jan 08, 2014 9:55 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Apr 11, 2009 2:15 pm
Posts: 5914
Location: NYC
Ready to run screaming into the very cold street outside. I was misinformed by two or three different reps at Samsung whom I called before deciding to buy this thing that the 3.5mm audio out port would provide full output if using headphones. It doesn't. That output needs amplification. The sound in the headphones from that output is quite weak and really unusable, making the inline volume control I bought for that purpose completely unnecessary. Two possibilities now: return it to newegg (already got an RMA for that) or connect the 3.5mm audio out on the TV to amplified external speakers (maybe the ones MB linked above? Or even cheaper, since this is becoming more expensive than I ever though it would be just in order to be able to use headphones, these cheaper speakers and then use the headphone jack on those, while having to manually control the volume at the speakers themselves, and with the inline headphone volume control. The TV won't control anything for the sound once the external speaker setting is selected.

Will either of those external speakers connect to the audio out mini jack on the TV and work properly? If I'm buying external speakers, what do I look for? Must be able to connect to the 3.5mm mini jack on the TV. Will most inexpensive PC speakers work?

Probably not much help: the Samsung has a digital (optical) audio out.

Looking around, it appears there are no current 32" LED TVs with headphone jacks. Why the fuck did they do that?

The other, probably remote possibility, is to use this KanexPro HDMI to Component Converter with Audio with my older 480i Toshiba CRT, which has component inputs. But B&H tells me it's dicey whether it will work properly with the Apple TV2/Netflix. Sometimes it does, sometimes it doesn't.
EDIT: Won't work because the Apple TV isn't compatible with 480i, only 480p.

Or just use the small hand-me-down Samsung from my son for viewing Netflix only, and keep the Toshiba CRT connected as well.

Any and all ideas, including completely giving up on this project, welcome.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jan 08, 2014 11:17 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 15, 2008 8:20 pm
Posts: 2252
what about this connected to tv out. it should be amplified by the TV?
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jan 08, 2014 1:04 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 15, 2008 8:13 pm
Posts: 9442
Location: Caught between the moon and NYC
I was going to suggest these:
http://www.monoprice.com/Product/?c_id= ... 1&format=1

But it looks like Monoprice has killed them off. They actually don't sound bad, and have a small amp in them (powered by a USB port, which the TV has). For the price they couldn't be beat.

As for why few 32" TVs have headphone jacks, I would guess it's because at that size you've crossed the line from personal TV to "home theater" TVs, where they assume you're going to have a component audio system to connect it to.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jan 08, 2014 4:28 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 15, 2008 8:07 pm
Posts: 2407
Location: Inside Flatus Maximus
mc68k wrote:
what about this connected to tv out. it should be amplified by the TV?
Image


That is a line level signal. It is not amplified by the TV. And those cables are meant for use in attaching such an output jack to an amplifier/AVR.

I also recommend the following settings:

Eco Sensor: OFF
Energy Saver: OFF
Brightness: 50 or greater
Contrast: ~85 (you can calibrate from this or just use whatever, but this joins well with Brightness=50).
HDMI Black Level: NORMAL
Digital Noise Filter: OFF
LED Motion Plus: OFF (you'll get a headache if it's on - I'll explain below)
Picture Options -> Size: Screen Fit (1:1 pixel mapping)
Sharpness: 0 (for non-analog inputs, explained below)
Picture Mode: Standard or Movie. Avoid Dynamic at all costs. See below.
Color Space: Auto (Native oversaturates and overrides source color depth/gamut output)
Gamma: 2 or 3
Dynamic Contrast: OFF
Black Tone: OFF
Motion Lighting: OFF
Color Tone: Cool (for PC/Mac input and game consoles if you prefer computer color gamut), otherwise Standard

LED Motion Plus: This feature makes the LED backlight strobe on and off 60 times per second. It has the potential to reduce motion blur slightly, but you will quickly find that not only does it give you a headache, but it darkens the picture and causes detail loss. This is best left off. This is not the same as Auto Motion Plus, discussed below.

Picture Mode - Dynamic: This feature is used in the store to "wow" potential customers. It overrides calibration and selected colorspace/saturation controls on a scene by scene basis. For consistency, never use this mode.

Dynamic Contrast: Same as Picture Mode - Dynamic, only this feature controls the contrast.

LED/Auto Motion Plus: Clear adds some "smoothing" to the picture to reduce motion blur. This is equivalant to 3/3 in the Custom menu. Standard adds more smoothing. This is equivalant to 5/5 in the Custom menu. Smooth turns the smoothing effect on full bore and creates a very "soap opera camera" effect where the picture seems to glide across the screen during panning like many UK shows broadcast in the U.S. appear to have (or how soap operas appear on CRT TVs, hence the term "soap opera camera"). This is equivalant to 10/10 in the Custom menu.

The above settings list is a guide only and you can disregard if you wish. It is here as a baseline reference for the minimum settings required to disable the "feature" where the TV just plain shuts off the picture when the scene gets near pitch darkness. You'll quickly notice how awful that feature is when a scene is very dark, but would normally still have a few visible elements and the screen just shuts off (Babylon 5 has tons of these scenes for example) or how it will switch the display off and back on rapidly during fades in video games which have ultra clean signals and no noise at all that might be considered "visible elements". This feature is referred to as "CE Dimming" and is built into all Samsung TVs and is non-defeatable under normal circumstances even in the service menu. Only the settings I outlined above regarding Black Tone, HDMI Black Level, and Brightness can defeat this feature when set to the minimum specified values. Note: Brightness below 50 will allow the CE Dimming feature to activate regardless of any other settings.

_________________
Official Mac Tech Support Forum Cookie™ (Mint Chocolate Chip)
Guaranteed tasty; Potentially volatile when dipped in WWIII Forum Syrup®
Caution: This cookie bites back.


Last edited by Squishy Tia on Thu Jan 09, 2014 2:56 pm, edited 2 times in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jan 08, 2014 6:03 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Apr 11, 2009 2:15 pm
Posts: 5914
Location: NYC
Thanks for all that. Will try those out.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jan 09, 2014 12:30 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 15, 2008 8:13 pm
Posts: 9442
Location: Caught between the moon and NYC
Quote:
LED Motion Plus: This feature makes the LED backlight strobe on and off 60 times per second. It has the potential to reduce motion blur slightly, but you will quickly find that not only does it give you a headache, but it darkens the picture and causes detail loss. This is best left off. This is not the same as LED Motion Plus, discussed below.
Quote:
LED Motion Plus ... not the same as LED Motion Plus
Okay, now I'm confused. :lol:


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jan 09, 2014 7:58 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Apr 11, 2009 2:15 pm
Posts: 5914
Location: NYC
That one had me puzzled too.

I tried out those settings last night while watching a documentary, perhaps shot in HD, and with those it looked absolutely stunning. But, depending on the content (broadcast only, so far), I'm often seeing things looking either very washed out or too saturated, and I have to constantly go into the menu (very awkward and time consuming) to make changes. This is something I didn't have to do as frequently on the Toshiba CRT, and when I did, getting into the menu was far easier. If the Samsung had a way to memorize particular settings, which could be accessed by a simple button press, that would make life far easier.

If the missing headphone jack, including the workarounds for that, weren't enough, the coup de grace is that this Samsung apparently has a weak tuner. I don't have cable: I am able to get a very good selection of broadcast TV because I have either line of sight to the Empire State Building, from which most local stations broadcast, or a fairly good range of other stations, including one excellent PBS station on Long Island, which I rely on, although its signal may occasionally break up. With this new Samsung I can't get that one at all. The Toshiba + the digital converter has no problem with it and even the older 22" Samsung can pick it up easily. Theory: maybe Samsung, and perhaps any other brand as well, will now automatically reject what would formerly have been a sufficient, if borderline, signal because of their demanding new-fangled picture features? Or, forget that, maybe this one just has a piss poor tuner.

Since I can't keep buying and trying out different TVs, none of which have a headphone jack anyway, I'm leaning now towards using the older, small Samsung just for Netflix, and keeping the Toshiba CRT for everything else. The bedroom is going to begin to look like a TV showroom.

Sure enough, there are times when it can be really nice and add an extra dimension (not really sour grapes, since that was my intention in starting down this road), but I have to say that when I'm really involved in watching a film or a documentary, I'm usually too engrossed in the narrative to care all that much about being wowed by a large image and superior picture quality. Or, if you don't know what you're missing....

So much for my odyssey through the world of modern TV. Bah humbug.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jan 09, 2014 2:59 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 15, 2008 8:07 pm
Posts: 2407
Location: Inside Flatus Maximus
Yeah, having the brightness forced to 50 at a minimum to defeat the CE Dimming feature really sucks. But it's either that or your screen gets turned off and on during dark scenes, which is very jarring, and in video games almost always get one killed. I overcame much of that by using a special website to calibrate my TV to produce a much better picture. I'll see if I can dig up the bookmark and hopefully it's still there. It was invaluable to me, and it might save you as well.

Edit: Here is the LCD calibration site. Make sure you pay close attention to the gamma section as it's very important.

_________________
Official Mac Tech Support Forum Cookie™ (Mint Chocolate Chip)
Guaranteed tasty; Potentially volatile when dipped in WWIII Forum Syrup®
Caution: This cookie bites back.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jan 09, 2014 5:32 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Apr 11, 2009 2:15 pm
Posts: 5914
Location: NYC
Thanks, I'll keep that handy for the next one, if there is a next one. But this one is wrapped up and going back because of the shitty tuner + headphone problem. Completely forget which end went into the box first. Assumed it was the narrow end, and we struggled for hours like idiots trying to figure out how the two top styrofoam pieces fit, until we realized the TV needed to be reversed in the box.

(Btw, won't that calibration site only be good when the TV is used as a monitor?)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jan 09, 2014 7:28 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 15, 2008 8:07 pm
Posts: 2407
Location: Inside Flatus Maximus
WZZZ wrote:
Thanks, I'll keep that handy for the next one, if there is a next one. But this one is wrapped up and going back because of the shitty tuner + headphone problem. Completely forget which end went into the box first. Assumed it was the narrow end, and we struggled for hours like idiots trying to figure out how the two top styrofoam pieces fit, until we realized the TV needed to be reversed in the box.

(Btw, won't that calibration site only be good when the TV is used as a monitor?)


Once calibrated, all modes should look a lot better. An LCD TV is just a computer monitor with a tuner and inputs. Put it in the picture mode you intend to use and calibrate from there and you should be golden. You can always reset to defaults anyway if it looks bad.

Be aware though that for any TV you update the firmware on, write down your settings in each menu first. Most firmware updates are destructive and reset preferences.

_________________
Official Mac Tech Support Forum Cookie™ (Mint Chocolate Chip)
Guaranteed tasty; Potentially volatile when dipped in WWIII Forum Syrup®
Caution: This cookie bites back.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jan 09, 2014 8:14 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Apr 11, 2009 2:15 pm
Posts: 5914
Location: NYC
Refining the question further: isn't it necessary to connect the TV to the Mac in order to do the calibration from that site? If not, how else?

Do you think the tuner on the Samsung is weak, or would I encounter that problem receiving that station with any current TV because they are all now more demanding signal wise? With high quality equipment they used to publish specs on tuner sensitivity. Haven't seen anything like that for TVs. If I could have gotten that station, I would have been willing to keep this one and found a workaround for the no headphone jack and also done something about the uneven video. I haven't sent it back yet. Maybe a better antenna? This whole new TV thing has been driving me nuts.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jan 09, 2014 10:18 pm 
Offline
Benevolent Dictator
User avatar

Joined: Mon Apr 21, 2008 2:03 am
Posts: 14574
Quote:
in order to do the calibration from that site?

Yes.
Quote:
Do you think the tuner on the Samsung is weak, or would I encounter that problem receiving that station with any current TV because they are all now more demanding signal wise?


Does it have an Antenna input?

Even stringing a 20' Coax cable over my bedroom window brings 19 over the Air channels to my 70s 1.5" B&W Sanyu using Digital converter, without the cable I get maybe 4 channels.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jan 10, 2014 7:15 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 15, 2008 8:07 pm
Posts: 2407
Location: Inside Flatus Maximus
WZZZ wrote:
Refining the question further: isn't it necessary to connect the TV to the Mac in order to do the calibration from that site? If not, how else?

Do you think the tuner on the Samsung is weak, or would I encounter that problem receiving that station with any current TV because they are all now more demanding signal wise? With high quality equipment they used to publish specs on tuner sensitivity. Haven't seen anything like that for TVs. If I could have gotten that station, I would have been willing to keep this one and found a workaround for the no headphone jack and also done something about the uneven video. I haven't sent it back yet. Maybe a better antenna? This whole new TV thing has been driving me nuts.


If it's a smart TV, no. It should have a web browser in it to allow you to go directly to that page. But it's easier (and safer) to do it on a computer. Gamma on the computer should be set to 2.2 for proper calibration.

As for the weak tuner, digital is digital. It's all there or not there at all. If you aren't receiving a station, then it is likely an antenna problem, assuming OTA stations.

_________________
Official Mac Tech Support Forum Cookie™ (Mint Chocolate Chip)
Guaranteed tasty; Potentially volatile when dipped in WWIII Forum Syrup®
Caution: This cookie bites back.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jan 10, 2014 10:10 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Apr 11, 2009 2:15 pm
Posts: 5914
Location: NYC
Moved the antenna much higher up on the window and I'm now getting that station. Don't think I'll find anything better, so I'm keeping it. (Much relieved at not having to drive to UPS in this bad weather.) But I'm pretty convinced they don't bother putting a great tuner in these things because they assume most people will be using cable. Now on to finding the best external speaker with headphone jack solution.

It's not a smart tv; I'm using it with Apple TV. Is there a way to do the calibration wirelessly from that? Other than that, would need mini display port to HDMI. But no emergency for getting that done.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jan 10, 2014 1:41 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 15, 2008 8:10 pm
Posts: 3201
Location: Spain
Squishy Tia wrote:
As for the weak tuner, digital is digital. It's all there or not there at all. If you aren't receiving a station, then it is likely an antenna problem, assuming OTA stations.


Digital is digital to a point. For DVB there is a specification that broadcasters, relayers, tuners etc should adhere to and you would think that everything would be hunky dory exactly because it's digital. Unfortunately that's not the case in reality. DVB (at least the type used in Europe) might be great in a laboratory setting but has serious issues in some real world settings. For example, if you live on the coast, in an extremely hot area or somewhere hilly you will find digital blind spots and interference issues in more areas than with analogue TV.

So over here everybody thought digital would solve reception problems but it didn't. First people bought digital set top box decoders and adapted their antennas. All the equipment was within specification but sometimes didn't work well. The root issue was often that tuner sensitivity specs were fully adhering to the specifications but it just weren't sensitive enough. Set top box manufacturers saw what was happening and moved to improve product design, specifically tuner sensitivity.

Nobody got refunds for tuners that 'didn't work' because what they had was within spec. This is a case of industry failing in many realworld scenarios. If you look for a tuner nowadays and live in a problem area you should always try to get a device that says it has a high sensitivity tuner demodulator. Take a look at this product page for an example.

That's good for independent boxes but not much help for built in tuners as rarely do TV manufacturers speak of the tech specs of their tuners.

To give you an idea, in the same room and running off the same antenna cable I have a top of the line Samsung set with built in tuner and a five year old plasma with a cheap but modern external tuner. The reception is better on the external box with the plasma than on the Samsung. Unfortunately signal reception is one thing and picture display is another. The Samsung's built in DVB picture display is better than the output coming out of my external tuner on the plasma.

_________________
VILA: They missed us! Avon's gadget works!
BLAKE: [to Avon] Is something wrong?
AVON: It just occurred to me, that as the description of a highly sophisticated technological achievement, 'Avon's gadget works' seems to lack a certain style.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jan 10, 2014 2:14 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Apr 11, 2009 2:15 pm
Posts: 5914
Location: NYC
Exactly right. I was looking around earlier today about this issue and found some board where someone had the exact same experience as me. Went from a converter box and analog TV to a new Samsung, and found that the tuner in the Samsung was weak. Couldn't receive stations he'd been getting before. The converter box outperformed the new digital TV. But as I already said even the older digital Samsung was doing OK. Just not this new one.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jan 10, 2014 7:25 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 15, 2008 8:07 pm
Posts: 2407
Location: Inside Flatus Maximus
Avon B7 wrote:
Squishy Tia wrote:
As for the weak tuner, digital is digital. It's all there or not there at all. If you aren't receiving a station, then it is likely an antenna problem, assuming OTA stations.


Digital is digital to a point. For DVB there is a specification that broadcasters, relayers, tuners etc should adhere to and you would think that everything would be hunky dory exactly because it's digital. Unfortunately that's not the case in reality. DVB (at least the type used in Europe) might be great in a laboratory setting but has serious issues in some real world settings. For example, if you live on the coast, in an extremely hot area or somewhere hilly you will find digital blind spots and interference issues in more areas than with analogue TV.

So over here everybody thought digital would solve reception problems but it didn't. First people bought digital set top box decoders and adapted their antennas. All the equipment was within specification but sometimes didn't work well. The root issue was often that tuner sensitivity specs were fully adhering to the specifications but it just weren't sensitive enough. Set top box manufacturers saw what was happening and moved to improve product design, specifically tuner sensitivity.

Nobody got refunds for tuners that 'didn't work' because what they had was within spec. This is a case of industry failing in many realworld scenarios. If you look for a tuner nowadays and live in a problem area you should always try to get a device that says it has a high sensitivity tuner demodulator. Take a look at this product page for an example.

That's good for independent boxes but not much help for built in tuners as rarely do TV manufacturers speak of the tech specs of their tuners.

To give you an idea, in the same room and running off the same antenna cable I have a top of the line Samsung set with built in tuner and a five year old plasma with a cheap but modern external tuner. The reception is better on the external box with the plasma than on the Samsung. Unfortunately signal reception is one thing and picture display is another. The Samsung's built in DVB picture display is better than the output coming out of my external tuner on the plasma.


Yeah, digital doesn't like bouncing off of objects very much, so line of sight is usually the best way to get a clean signal. But the fact does remain that it's all there or not there at all (meaning static or dropouts indicates you're getting a signal, but not all the time). And yes, TV tuners barely fit within the QAM specifications. Oddly enough though, they do still accept an analog input via the antenna input. You could try the converter box on the antenna port and see if it helps any. Worth a shot anyway, but you won't get HD that way.

_________________
Official Mac Tech Support Forum Cookie™ (Mint Chocolate Chip)
Guaranteed tasty; Potentially volatile when dipped in WWIII Forum Syrup®
Caution: This cookie bites back.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jan 10, 2014 8:24 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Apr 11, 2009 2:15 pm
Posts: 5914
Location: NYC
Quote:
Oddly enough though, they do still accept an analog input via the antenna input. You could try the converter box on the antenna port and see if it helps any. Worth a shot anyway, but you won't get HD that way.


Interesting. The coax from the antenna is still going through the converter box, turned off, in pass-through mode. I was afraid of what might happen if it were turned on. When I was looking for a better position for the antenna (which is, by the way, only a simple loop) for reception from that station, I was relying on the signal strength indicator from the converter with the Toshiba still connected. In its new position, I was often seeing a signal almost at the top of the Good range, so I think I might be OK now.

Found this for using the Apple TV as a browser. So I might be able to do the calibration that way.

http://www.tuaw.com/2013/12/21/airweb-p ... -apple-tv/

EDIT: hadn't paid any attention to this on the specs page.

TV Tuner* System
DTV Tuner/Digital Cable Tuner/Analog Tuner

Analog Tuner?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Jan 18, 2014 8:15 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Apr 11, 2009 2:15 pm
Posts: 5914
Location: NYC
Update: Took MB's suggestion and have ordered these. Can't stand the sound from the tinny speakers in the TV, so this hopefully cures that problem + gives me a headphone jack.

But still faced with no way to control the volume of the external speakers using the TV remote. Would this work: what if I place an inline volume control between the TV and the external speakers? The idea is to run a long wire from the 3.5 mini audio out (line level) of the Samsung, with the inline volume control (the one I already bought) where we watch the TV and then back out to the external speakers. That effectively places a pot between the audio out and the speakers. Very clumsy, but I can't think of anything better.

EDIT: I should mention that, doing it this way, the trip from the TV to the speakers will be 30+ feet. Will the drop that produces make the output too low for amplification by the speakers, or do something that the amplifier in the speakers won't be happy with? Buzzing, humming from that long trip in unshielded wire?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jan 21, 2014 4:56 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Apr 11, 2009 2:15 pm
Posts: 5914
Location: NYC
Kind of a bump. Does anyone with some knowledge of the electronics involved in this think that this arrangement--aside from whether or not it would sound decent or not-- might be harmful (e.g. creating badly mismatched impedance, or etc.) in any way to either the TV or the amp in the speakers?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jan 21, 2014 11:16 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 15, 2008 8:07 pm
Posts: 2407
Location: Inside Flatus Maximus
WZZZ wrote:
Kind of a bump. Does anyone with some knowledge of the electronics involved in this think that this arrangement--aside from whether or not it would sound decent or not-- might be harmful (e.g. creating badly mismatched impedance, or etc.) in any way to either the TV or the amp in the speakers?


If your run is that long you might run into both interference issues and amplification issues. Unfortunately we're not going to be able to tell until you try it out. Sometimes it works great at that length, other times it just flat out fails. Analog = trial and error a lot of the times when dealing with anything longer than six feet.

_________________
Official Mac Tech Support Forum Cookie™ (Mint Chocolate Chip)
Guaranteed tasty; Potentially volatile when dipped in WWIII Forum Syrup®
Caution: This cookie bites back.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jan 21, 2014 2:10 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Apr 11, 2009 2:15 pm
Posts: 5914
Location: NYC
Will have to experiment. Thanks.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jan 21, 2014 5:27 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 15, 2008 8:13 pm
Posts: 9442
Location: Caught between the moon and NYC
I know this is going to emit some form of groan, but another medium (wireless, cat 5, etc.) would probably help if the signal is degraded. It'd mean one more thing to purchase of course, but it would help solve interference.

At school we drive audio signals far longer distances than 30ft, but they're balanced inputs/outputs that have been adapted to Cat5. With that TV/speakers combination you'd be dealing with unbalanced inputs/outputs, which are far more prone to interference.

Basically you could put some kind of adapter at each end of the connection to bridge to a different medium for the interference-prone portion of the run. This would probably work, though obviously you'd need a Cat 5/5e/6 cable to go with it. This might be a more "tidy" setup. They make a slightly cheaper model that's 2.4Ghz, but I'd avoid it if you care about WiFi performance on 2.4Ghz.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 62 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next

All times are UTC - 8 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group